Cars

Louisville leaders make progress in cleaning up abandoned cars

Louisville leaders make progress in cleaning up abandoned cars

You’ve probably seen them around the Louisville metro – abandoned cars on the freeway, in neighborhoods and places you might not expect. This is a problem that has only been made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic and the LMPD towing ground being at full capacity. But Louisville leaders say they’re making progress getting abandoned vehicles off the streets. And in recent months, that’s been more of a priority for the mayor’s office. LMPD Maj. Emily McKinley said during a Friday briefing. that the police department has been able to remove nearly 300 abandoned cars from the streets since January. Tackling overcrowding: An empty lot in Shively could become a solution for the LMPD’s pound, but not everyone on board. blamed in part on the fact that the LMPD could not tow the cars because the terrain was overcrowded. The city said it was offering solutions. So what are they doing? City leaders said Friday they are holding online auctions so people can buy cars from the lot. They have also reduced the number of cars in the lot in criminal detention by working with the Commonwealth Attorney’s Office. They even hired an appraiser to appraise the scrap cars. “We know we’re making progress and obviously this issue didn’t happen overnight, it won’t be fixed overnight,” McKinley said. “It’s a long-term project, it’s a forever project and it’s something we will continue to address and improve over time.” Officials said there are currently about 1,250 cars at the Frankfort Avenue tow lot. And each day they towed around 30 and released 10-15 cars, highlighting progress on that front compared to what had been happening before. Greg Zahradnik lived near an abandoned car on Barrett Avenue that had the whole neighborhood complaining for months. “We kept calling, people were writing, all sorts of things,” Zahradnik said. “I’ve heard people say we should burn it. Some people wanted to push it into Eastern Pkwy so they’d have to pick it up because it’s a main street whereas Barrett I guess is a side street but I really think eventually, at some point, someone would have been hurt.” Shedding light on the situation: Amid towing problems, residents of the Louisville neighborhood find humor in a long-abandoned car. Video sent to WLKY showed when the vehicle was finally moved earlier this year. Residents said they don’t know who moved it and it doesn’t matter. “Just the fact that he left was fine, so if a private person took him, thank you,” Zahradnik said. “Whatever happens, no one cares.” City leaders also said the amnesty period helped them remove 89 vehicles from the tow lot and open up space. But Police Chief Erika Shields said the city knows it’s a priority. is not only because of the danger that abandoned cars pose on highways and roads, but also because of the danger that abandoned cars pose to communities. “There’s nothing stopping kids from getting in there,” Shields said. “We had a shooting earlier this week. There were several children and a 13 year old ended up being shot in an abandoned car. They had just come in there to play and someone had a gun fire with them. real danger to communities when the cars start to be dismantled, people take the tires, the catalytic converter, it goes on cement blocks. When you have children playing in a neighborhood, you don’t “don’t need cars on cement blocks. community for putting pressure on them to make it a priority. Zahradnik said he hopes the new fixes will be a long-term solution.” millions of dollars looking for new land, they have to do with what they have,” Zahradnik said. They said you can now report abandoned cars on the 311 subway app and whatever you need is one photo of the car and its location.

You’ve probably seen them around the Louisville metro – abandoned cars on the freeway, in neighborhoods and in places you might not expect.

This is a problem that has only been made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic and the LMPD’s towing lot being at full capacity. But Louisville leaders say they are making progress in getting abandoned vehicles off the streets.

And in recent months, it has become a priority for the town hall.

LMPD Maj. Emily McKinley said in a Friday briefing that the police department has been able to remove nearly 300 abandoned cars from the streets since January.

Fighting overcrowding: An empty lot in Shively could become a solution for the LMPD impound lot, but not everyone on board

She said that’s a big number considering the number of reports that have been written about the problem – a problem partly blamed on the LMPD not being able to tow cars because the ground was overcrowded.

The city says it offers solutions.

So what are they doing? City leaders said Friday they are holding online auctions so people can buy cars from the lot. They have also reduced the number of cars in the lot in criminal detention by working with the Commonwealth Attorney’s Office.

They even hired an appraiser to appraise the scrap cars.

“We know we’re making progress and obviously this issue didn’t happen overnight, it won’t be fixed overnight,” McKinley said. “It’s a long-term project, it’s a forever project and it’s something we will continue to address and improve over time.”

Officials said there are currently about 1,250 cars at the Frankfort Avenue tow lot. And each day they towed around 30 and released 10-15 cars, highlighting progress on that front compared to what had been happening before.

Greg Zahradnik lived near an abandoned car on Barrett Avenue that had the whole neighborhood complaining for months.

“We kept calling, people were writing, all sorts of things,” Zahradnik said. “I’ve heard people say we should burn it. Some people wanted to push it into Eastern Pkwy so they’d have to pick it up because it’s a main street whereas Barrett I guess is a side street but I really think eventually, at some point, someone would have been hurt.”

Shedding light on the situation: Amid tow lot troubles, Louisville neighborhood residents find humor in long-abandoned car

Video sent to WLKY showed when the vehicle was finally moved earlier this year. Residents said they don’t know who moved it and it doesn’t matter.

“Just the fact that he left was fine, so if a private person took him, thank you,” Zahradnik said. “Whatever happened, no one cares.”

City leaders also said the amnesty period helped them remove 89 vehicles from the tow lot and open up space.

But Police Chief Erika Shields said one of the main reasons the city knows it’s a priority isn’t just because of the danger of abandoned cars on highways and roads. , but also the danger that abandoned cars pose to communities.

“There’s nothing stopping kids from getting in there,” Shields said. “We had a shooting earlier this week. There were several children and a 13 year old ended up being shot in an abandoned car. They had just come in there to play and someone had a gun fire with them. real danger for communities when cars start to disassemble, people take the tires, the catalytic converter, it goes on cement blocks. When you have children playing in a neighborhood, you don’t you don’t need cars on cement blocks.

City leaders also thanked the community for putting pressure on them to make it a priority.

Zahradnik said he hopes the new patches will be a long-term solution.

“Instead of spending millions of dollars looking for new land, they have to go with what they have,” Zahradnik said.

They said you can now report abandoned cars on the 311 subway app and all you need is a photo of the car and its location.